Ask!   About me   Disclaimer   My photography   

Astronomy with a helping of physics and a pinch of the other sciences.


Shedding new light on star death: A new class of super-luminous supernovae

Astronomers at Queen’s University Belfast have shed new light on the rarest and brightest exploding stars ever discovered in the universe. The research is published tomorrow in Nature. It proposes that the most luminous supernovae – exploding stars – are powered by small and incredibly dense neutron stars, with gigantic magnetic fields that spin hundreds of times a second.
Scientists at Queen’s Astrophysics Research Centre observed two super-luminous supernovae – two of the Universe’s brightest exploding stars – for more than a year. Contrary to existing theories, which suggested that the brightest supernovae are caused by super-massive stars exploding, their findings suggest that their origins may be better explained by a type of explosion within the star’s core which creates a smaller but extremely dense and rapidly spinning magnetic star.

Continue reading via Phys.org
Image: A neutron star. Credit: NASA.

Shedding new light on star death: A new class of super-luminous supernovae

Astronomers at Queen’s University Belfast have shed new light on the rarest and brightest exploding stars ever discovered in the universe. The research is published tomorrow in Nature. It proposes that the most luminous supernovae – exploding stars – are powered by small and incredibly dense neutron stars, with gigantic magnetic fields that spin hundreds of times a second.

Scientists at Queen’s Astrophysics Research Centre observed two super-luminous supernovae – two of the Universe’s brightest exploding stars – for more than a year. Contrary to existing theories, which suggested that the brightest supernovae are caused by super-massive stars exploding, their findings suggest that their origins may be better explained by a type of explosion within the star’s core which creates a smaller but extremely dense and rapidly spinning magnetic star.

Continue reading via Phys.org

Image: A neutron star. Credit: NASA.

— 11 months ago with 148 notes
#physics  #astrophysics  #supernova  #supernovae  #neutron star 
  1. dazamarie reblogged this from astronemma
  2. kaleidoscopic-memories reblogged this from mentalalchemy
  3. pragmatic-dude reblogged this from astronemma
  4. i-photosynthesize reblogged this from tekeli-li-tekeli-li
  5. tekeli-li-tekeli-li reblogged this from astronemma
  6. steakhuis reblogged this from adelaydeorchid
  7. wandererofthevoid reblogged this from blackdragonamatreon
  8. blackdragonamatreon reblogged this from astronemma
  9. astro-stoner reblogged this from passthechloroform
  10. bythetaillights reblogged this from astronemma
  11. sebby-zar reblogged this from lawey123
  12. the-social-recluse reblogged this from astronemma
  13. pilot-non-flying reblogged this from you-are-the-universe
  14. besoundstaysound reblogged this from mentalalchemy
  15. lawey123 reblogged this from psy-geist
  16. psy-geist reblogged this from mentalalchemy
  17. sraee reblogged this from you-are-the-universe
  18. dream-in-nightmare reblogged this from you-are-the-universe
  19. magickpisces reblogged this from you-are-the-universe
  20. spiritual-cruise reblogged this from you-are-the-universe
  21. you-are-the-universe reblogged this from ours-is-the-light
  22. ours-is-the-light reblogged this from panta-rhea
  23. collection0fparadoxes reblogged this from mentalalchemy
  24. holdthispope reblogged this from mentalalchemy