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Astronomy with a large helping of physics and a pinch of the other sciences.

A Study in Scarlet

ESO: This new image from ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile reveals a cloud of hydrogen called Gum 41. In the middle of this little-known nebula, brilliant hot young stars are giving off energetic radiation that causes the surrounding hydrogen to glow with a characteristic red hue.

Continue reading via ESO

A Study in Scarlet

ESO: This new image from ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile reveals a cloud of hydrogen called Gum 41. In the middle of this little-known nebula, brilliant hot young stars are giving off energetic radiation that causes the surrounding hydrogen to glow with a characteristic red hue.

Continue reading via ESO

— 1 day ago with 61 notes
#astronomy  #ESO  #nebula  #Gum 41 
Anonymous asked: Hi I'm from the Philippines and I still tried waiting for the eclipse here to happen at around 3 am (even tho it says it'll be visible here at 2:00am EST which is 2pm here) and I just wonder (since it says in the graphs that it'll still be partially visible here) if it is at 2pm, any chances I'd still see it? :(


Answer:

The Moon will be rising as the Sun is setting, with the eclipse already being underway when you see it rise in the Philippines tonight. You might be able to catch the end of it though!

image

[Visibility of the lunar eclipse around the World]

— 2 days ago with 2 notes
#I hope this makes sense because I couldn't think of how to word it  #basically the eclipse only lasts a few hours and you'll catch the end of it when you see the Moon as it rises  #Anonymous 

thescienceofreality:

What is a lunar eclipse tetrad and where will you be able to see it [starting tonight]? | Video Credit: ScienceAtNASA | Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech, & Joe Rao/Space.com

On April 15, 2014, an extraordinary series of total lunar eclipses will begin in the United States. This series, called a lunar eclipse tetrad, will result in four red moons over the course of a year and a half. NASA explains the significance behind this phenomenon, and sheds light on how the moon transforms into a bright red orb. Via TED-Ed

When and where it will be visible:

The first total lunar eclipse of 2014 occurs in the overnight hours tonight (April 14) and will be visible across most of North America, South America, Hawaii and parts of Alaska. Depending on your location, it begins either late tonight or in the wee hours of Tuesday, but as with every skywatching event, you can only see it if Mother Nature cooperates.

Tonight’s lunar eclipse runs from 12:53 a.m. EDT (0453 GMT) to about 6 a.m. EDT (1000 GMT). If bad weather spoils your view, or you live in Europe or elsewhere outside the visibility zone, you can always watch live webcasts of the total lunar eclipse on Space.com, courtesy of NASA, the Slooh community telescope, the Virtual Telescope Project.

What happens during lunar eclipses?

Lunar eclipses happen when the moon is in the full moon stage and passes through part or all of the Earth’s shadow, darkening the moon’s typically bright glow. During a total lunar eclipse, the moon is entirely immersed in Earth shadow, and can take on a dusky “blood red” colour due to the scattering of sunlight through the edges of Earth’s atmosphere. Such moons are sometimes nicknamed “Blood Moons.”

Tonight’s lunar eclipse is the first of four consecutive total eclipses of the moon between April 2014 and September 2015 in what scientists call a lunar eclipse “tetrad” series. The next total lunar eclipse will occur on Oct. 8 and is also expected to be visible from much of North America. Via Space.com

Read more about 2014’s Lunar Eclipse Tetrad:

— 2 days ago with 1025 notes
#lunar eclipse 
skunkbear:

And here’s a handy GIF about tonight’s the lunar eclipse. For the west coasters (who have a better chance of seeing the eclipse through the clouds) just subtract 3 hours.  It’s basically a moving version of this NASA graphic.
GIFs not your style? Check out my last minute astronomical announcement song!

skunkbear:

And here’s a handy GIF about tonight’s the lunar eclipse. For the west coasters (who have a better chance of seeing the eclipse through the clouds) just subtract 3 hours.  It’s basically a moving version of this NASA graphic.

GIFs not your style? Check out my last minute astronomical announcement song!

(via scienceandscifi)

— 2 days ago with 6055 notes
#lunar eclipse  #go forth and observe!  #I can't here :( 

kenobi-wan-obi:

Earth’s Siblings: Inside The Planets

Click each for a neat and informative view of the neighboring planets in our Solar System.

via SPACE

(via laikas-owner)

— 2 days ago with 10696 notes
Anonymous asked: I've been hearing conspiracies about the Blood Moon eclipse, what is that exactly?


Answer:

I think it’s just what people are calling the lunar eclipse that’s happening tonight (which you should totally have a look at if it’s visible in your area). A lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth is directly between the Sun and the Moon, and the Earth’s shadow covers the Moon. Some say it holds religious and astrological significance, which may be where the conspiracies you’ve heard come from. There’s nothing out of the ordinary about it so don’t worry - sit back outside and enjoy the show. :)

Here’s where the eclipse will be visible:

[source]

— 2 days ago with 6 notes
#Anonymous 

procyonvulpecula:

Mars is just above the Moon right now, and it’s still pretty close to opposition (when it lies opposite the Sun in the sky and is therefore near maximum brightness.) Go look at it, it’s really bright and you can see its distinctive red colour!

— 2 days ago with 26 notes
#Mars 

The top image of the Sun is one I took about an hour ago with my phone, through the eyepiece of my telescope with a solar filter. Below is one of the latest images from SOHO, found here (credit: NASA). It was such a great feeling when I realised they matched! 

— 6 days ago with 48 notes
#astronomy  #solar astronomy  #sun  #astrophotography  #my astrophotos 
"Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know."
Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

(via astrotastic)

— 6 days ago with 54789 notes
#Cecilia Payne 
It clouded over before I could get my camera set up properly, but here’s a quick shot of the Moon I took with my phone through my ‘scope earlier.

It clouded over before I could get my camera set up properly, but here’s a quick shot of the Moon I took with my phone through my ‘scope earlier.

— 6 days ago with 51 notes
#astronomy  #Moon  #astrophotography  #my astrophotos 
sci-universe:

Today (April 8) is the best time of the year to spot and watch Mars!
The planet is at the point in its orbit where it is roughly closest to Earth, making it appear bigger and brighter. It’s visible almost all night, so if you have a chance, grab binoculars or a telescope and see Mars with your own eyes! The red planet appears as a ruddy shiny star in the constellation Virgo.  (Image: NASA, edited by me)

Tonight Mars is at opposition, which means that it is directly opposite the Sun in the sky, making it lovely and bright. Our closest approach won’t be until the 14th though, due to the elliptically of the orbits (they aren’t perfectly circular). However, don’t worry if you won’t be able to catch it, as Mars will still be looking good for a while yet. 

sci-universe:

Today (April 8) is the best time of the year to spot and watch Mars!

The planet is at the point in its orbit where it is roughly closest to Earth, making it appear bigger and brighter. It’s visible almost all night, so if you have a chance, grab binoculars or a telescope and see Mars with your own eyes! The red planet appears as a ruddy shiny star in the constellation Virgo.  (Image: NASA, edited by me)

Tonight Mars is at opposition, which means that it is directly opposite the Sun in the sky, making it lovely and bright. Our closest approach won’t be until the 14th though, due to the elliptically of the orbits (they aren’t perfectly circular). However, don’t worry if you won’t be able to catch it, as Mars will still be looking good for a while yet. 

— 1 week ago with 4245 notes
#Mars