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Astronomy with a large helping of physics and a pinch of the other sciences.

jdkittlesphotography:

Day 211 of my 365 Project. Star trail this evening. This is a 35 minute star trail
This evening was a nice night to do a star trail. This is 70 x 30 seconds merged together via Photoshop.

jdkittlesphotography:

Day 211 of my 365 Project. Star trail this evening. This is a 35 minute star trail

This evening was a nice night to do a star trail. This is 70 x 30 seconds merged together via Photoshop.

— 9 hours ago with 27 notes
#queue 
stojdllab:

Pretty image of the day from The Scientist: the human brain seen with diffusion tensor imaging. Read more at: http://bit.ly/1q9tFpkImage credit: Thomas Schultz

stojdllab:

Pretty image of the day from The Scientist: the human brain seen with diffusion tensor imaging.

Read more at: http://bit.ly/1q9tFpk

Image credit: Thomas Schultz

— 2 days ago with 923 notes
#biology 
stephenrahn:

M13 - Globular Cluster in Hercules. I did not use a telescope for this shot. I just used a Canon 60Da with a 135mm lens. This is a single three-minute exposure. #astrophotography #astronomy #messier #canon #space #science #stars #oriontelescopes

stephenrahn:

M13 - Globular Cluster in Hercules. I did not use a telescope for this shot. I just used a Canon 60Da with a 135mm lens. This is a single three-minute exposure. #astrophotography #astronomy #messier #canon #space #science #stars #oriontelescopes

— 2 days ago with 26 notes
#queue 
stephenrahn:

Andromeda Galaxy Clearing the Trees. Another shot with the Canon 60Da and 135mm lens on an Orion Sirius mount. This is a single three-minute exposure. The trees are blurry because the mount was tracking the stars and not the ground. #astronomy #astrophotography #andromeda #galaxy #m31 #space #stars #cosmos #universe #canon #oriontelescopes #60da

stephenrahn:

Andromeda Galaxy Clearing the Trees. Another shot with the Canon 60Da and 135mm lens on an Orion Sirius mount. This is a single three-minute exposure. The trees are blurry because the mount was tracking the stars and not the ground. #astronomy #astrophotography #andromeda #galaxy #m31 #space #stars #cosmos #universe #canon #oriontelescopes #60da

— 3 days ago with 94 notes
#queue 
stephenrahn:

This is M8 - The Lagoon Nebula. It was much cloudier and windier than I hoped on Saturday night. I only got a few “keeper” shots and here is one. #astronomy #astrophotography #oriontelescopes #canon #williamsoptics #space #stars #cosmos

stephenrahn:

This is M8 - The Lagoon Nebula. It was much cloudier and windier than I hoped on Saturday night. I only got a few “keeper” shots and here is one. #astronomy #astrophotography #oriontelescopes #canon #williamsoptics #space #stars #cosmos

— 3 days ago with 34 notes

kunalanand:

Late night astrophotography in Los Angeles. What a great evening of exploration and adventure. Ventura, CA.

— 4 days ago with 143 notes
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Took this at the start of the month but never posted. I really do like taking photos of the Moon.

Took this at the start of the month but never posted. I really do like taking photos of the Moon.

— 1 week ago with 60 notes
#astronomy  #astrophotography  #My Astrophotos  #Moon  #Trees 
kodemunkey asked: Hi Emma, What equipment do you use for observing?


Answer:

Hi! My telescope is a Celestron Astromaster 130 EQ (so a 5.1” Newtonian). I have a range of Meade eyepieces that go from 6.4mm to 40mm, a couple of colour filters, a Moon filter, and a 2x Barlow lens. Currently have a Telrad on my ‘scope and a Baader solar filter I can put on the front. Depends on what I’m observing, but everything I’ve mentioned has come in handy at some point!

Most of my photos that I post were taken with my phone through the ‘scope (easier to get in focus than a camera). Having said that, my family has a camera with a pretty good zoom, so sometimes I use that on its own for lunar photos. 

— 1 week ago with 9 notes
#kodemunkey  #ask  #astronomy 

lifeinretrograde replied to your post: Solar observing today. Barely a sunspo…

Nice! What sun filter did you use? :)

I believe it’s made out of Baader film. Nothing fancy, just something to block most of the light from entering my ‘scope. :)

— 1 week ago with 2 notes
#lifeinretrograde 

Solar observing today. Barely a sunspot in sight!

(Usual warning about the dangers of observing the Sun: make sure you have the right equipment - in my case a solar filter for the front of my ‘scope - and know how to use it).

— 1 week ago with 135 notes
#ignore how bad the photo is  #the dark smudge is a sunspot I swear  #astronomy  #astrophotography  #solar astronomy  #solar astrophotography  #Sun  #My Astrophotos  #also yes that is tape on the tripod I have a new leg for it and will get round to fixing it sometime 

s-c-i-guy:

Summer Solstice 2014

Throwback Sunday to when I took this picture of the night sky above the Polebridge Mercantile Summer Solstice Party in Polebridge, Glacier National Park. Luck was on my side when I took the second picture, during the time that the shutter was open the International Space Station’s solar panels hit just the right angle reflecting the sun directly onto my camera’s sensor.  That day was a good day indeed.

(Source: adamhrabovsky)

— 1 week ago with 143 notes
#queue 
mashable:

45 years ago today, Apollo 11 landed on the first humans on the moon. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface.

mashable:

45 years ago today, Apollo 11 landed on the first humans on the moon. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface.

(Source: vine.co)

— 1 week ago with 1148 notes
sci-universe:

The line above is the spectrum of a star Beta Ursae Minoris “recorded” in 1976. As I mentioned in a recent post, I was working on astronomical photographic plates. There are about 2000 of such plates in the archives of Tartu Observatory’s astrophysics department and they all hold important and unique observing data of various stars. I digitalized a part of the collection and data which also had to be adjusted and organized.The spectrums recorded from the stars’ light show the chemical composition of them. It was discovered in 19th century and it lead to the birth of astrophysics. (You can read all about its history here.) The technique involved a telescope which collected the light from the object of interest (it didn’t have to be a star), spectrograph which broke the light into a spectrum, and a glass plate with specific emulsion.Observatories around the world have similar archives as the spectroscopy  with astronomical photoplates was the best way to research stars at that time. Now most of them are being digitalized to make an available database which could be very useful for historical research.This is what the spectrum plates of our observatory look like:

sci-universe:

The line above is the spectrum of a star Beta Ursae Minoris “recorded” in 1976. As I mentioned in a recent post, I was working on astronomical photographic plates. There are about 2000 of such plates in the archives of Tartu Observatory’s astrophysics department and they all hold important and unique observing data of various stars. I digitalized a part of the collection and data which also had to be adjusted and organized.

The spectrums recorded from the stars’ light show the chemical composition of them. It was discovered in 19th century and it lead to the birth of astrophysics. (You can read all about its history here.) The technique involved a telescope which collected the light from the object of interest (it didn’t have to be a star), spectrograph which broke the light into a spectrum, and a glass plate with specific emulsion.
Observatories around the world have similar archives as the spectroscopy  with astronomical photoplates was the best way to research stars at that time. Now most of them are being digitalized to make an available database which could be very useful for historical research.

This is what the spectrum plates of our observatory look like:

— 1 week ago with 199 notes
#queue