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Astronomy with a large helping of physics and a pinch of the other sciences.

stephenrahn:

This was my first real attempt at the Veil Nebula. I need a lot more data, but you can make out parts of it near the center. #astronomy #astrophotography #nebula #canon #60da #space #stars #milkyway #stars

stephenrahn:

This was my first real attempt at the Veil Nebula. I need a lot more data, but you can make out parts of it near the center. #astronomy #astrophotography #nebula #canon #60da #space #stars #milkyway #stars

(via physicsshiny)

— 3 days ago with 39 notes
#queue 

oplik:

I took a lot of pictures of Robin’s Tesla coil last night. I did some longer exposures and then some short exposures to get only a single spark while holding down the shutter to take continuous pictures.

We also stuck a radiometer on the top of it. The radiometer contains low pressure gas which emits light when current flows through it acting similar to a fluorescent light bulb. Here’s how a radiometer normally works.

The pictures I took of the radiometer vary in brightness because I adjusted the exposure on each picture. When we were watching it was a fairly consistent brightness.

— 3 days ago with 219 notes
stephenrahn:

In the upper-left you can see the Triangulum Galaxy. It’s approximately 3 million light years away, which is relatively close to us compared to most other galaxies. #astrophotography #astronomy #galaxy #60da #canon #135mm #135f2 #space #stars #science #universe #cosmos

stephenrahn:

In the upper-left you can see the Triangulum Galaxy. It’s approximately 3 million light years away, which is relatively close to us compared to most other galaxies. #astrophotography #astronomy #galaxy #60da #canon #135mm #135f2 #space #stars #science #universe #cosmos

— 1 week ago with 90 notes
carolynporco:

So pleased that our findings from the 6.5-yr imaging survey I conducted with Cassini’s high resolution camera of the geyser basin capping Enceladus’ southern hemisphere made the cover of the Astronomical Journal! How sweet it is! [Scientists love this sort of thing ;-) ]

carolynporco:

So pleased that our findings from the 6.5-yr imaging survey I conducted with Cassini’s high resolution camera of the geyser basin capping Enceladus’ southern hemisphere made the cover of the Astronomical Journal!

How sweet it is! [Scientists love this sort of thing ;-) ]

(via megacosms)

— 1 week ago with 73 notes
#Carolyn Porco is my idol 

oplik:

Went up to Mt. Washington last night. The sky was great! The trees were kind of in my way and there was also some annoying lighting but I worked with it

— 1 week ago with 86 notes
#lovely stuff 
stephenrahn:

I broke out the fisheye lens to capture the Milky Way from horizon to horizon. #milkyway #fisheye #canon #canon_usa #6d #space #stars #universe #cosmos #galaxy #astronomy #astrophotography #bestestaward

stephenrahn:

I broke out the fisheye lens to capture the Milky Way from horizon to horizon. #milkyway #fisheye #canon #canon_usa #6d #space #stars #universe #cosmos #galaxy #astronomy #astrophotography #bestestaward

— 1 week ago with 37 notes
Calling all UoM students!

uomastrosoc:

Hi everyone!

I’m Emma, also known on tumblr as astronemma, and I’m ‘Science Officer’ of the University of Manchester Astronomy Society. This means I organise stargazing events and the like for the society, but I’ve also taken it upon myself to set up this blog. 

As a society, we organise many events to get involved with. These include: trips to Jodrell Bank; stargazing evenings; lectures on a range of astronomical topics by experienced speakers; camping trips to less light-polluted areas; and much more. We have a range of equipment including telescopes, but you’re more than welcome to use your own if you have it!

So, if you’ve been a student here at UoM for a while now, or you’re joining us in September, and you have an interest in astronomy, then our society is for you! We already have a range of members from a number of different courses, and have a mix of experienced astronomers and interested newcomers amongst us. 

Our Facebook page and group are probably the best way of keeping informed for now, at least until we get this blog and our Twitter feed up and running properly. We’ll also have a stall running at the Fresher’s Fair, so come along and say hello!

 - Emma

— 1 week ago with 10 notes
#anyone here go to Manchester University?  #Know anyone that does?  #I set up a new blog  #probably only of interest if you go to UoM 
stephenrahn:

This is a single unguided shot with a 50mm lens and my Canon 6D on a regular tripod. Because of the focal length I was only to shoot for 8 seconds and not get any star trails. A lot of people tell me they can’t do astrophotography without a telescope or tracking mount. This shot is an example that shows that you can! #astrophotography #astronomy #milkyway #space #stars #universe #canon #6d #50mm #science #cosmos

stephenrahn:

This is a single unguided shot with a 50mm lens and my Canon 6D on a regular tripod. Because of the focal length I was only to shoot for 8 seconds and not get any star trails. A lot of people tell me they can’t do astrophotography without a telescope or tracking mount. This shot is an example that shows that you can! #astrophotography #astronomy #milkyway #space #stars #universe #canon #6d #50mm #science #cosmos

— 2 weeks ago with 380 notes
stephenrahn:

When is the last time you saw the Milky Way? Or have you never really seen it like this? I grew up in a rural area and I took it for granted. Now I live near a large city and I have to drive at least an hour to see it. I always look forward to that drive. I hope you will all find a way to see it. It’s getting more difficult with all the light pollution out there, but I hope you can do it. #astronomy #astrophotography #milkyway #space #stars #universe #galaxy #canon #oriontelescopes

stephenrahn:

When is the last time you saw the Milky Way? Or have you never really seen it like this? I grew up in a rural area and I took it for granted. Now I live near a large city and I have to drive at least an hour to see it. I always look forward to that drive. I hope you will all find a way to see it. It’s getting more difficult with all the light pollution out there, but I hope you can do it. #astronomy #astrophotography #milkyway #space #stars #universe #galaxy #canon #oriontelescopes

— 3 weeks ago with 196 notes

Lovely evening for a BBQ down at the observatory. Perfect solar viewing conditions too, or at least it was until I got my phone out to take a picture! Hopefully when it gets a bit darker we’ll be able to spot a few Perseid meteors. :)

— 3 weeks ago with 19 notes
#astronomy  #solar astronomy  #perseids 
the-science-llama:

Perseid Meteor ShowerNot as great as last year but still worthy of watching. The Full Moon will compete with the shower this year, lowering the peak-rates to around 40 or 60 meteors per hour at best, even in the darkest of skies. The peak time is Aug 10-13 but you can see meteors for about a week before and after, so start watching now! The earlier you watch, the less the moon will be in the way, so watching a few days before the peak might actually be better if not the same. For more stargazing events this month, see What’s Up for August. Also, Semi-Relevant/Informative post from last year

the-science-llama:

Perseid Meteor Shower
Not as great as last year but still worthy of watching. The Full Moon will compete with the shower this year, lowering the peak-rates to around 40 or 60 meteors per hour at best, even in the darkest of skies. The peak time is Aug 10-13 but you can see meteors for about a week before and after, so start watching now! The earlier you watch, the less the moon will be in the way, so watching a few days before the peak might actually be better if not the same. For more stargazing events this month, see What’s Up for August. Also, Semi-Relevant/Informative post from last year

(via astrotastic)

— 3 weeks ago with 11427 notes
#perseids 
Galileo Galilei, with his telescope from here August 21, 1609 widened the horizons of man in the fourth centenary*
This plaque, present on the viewing platform of St Mark’s Campanile, refers to Galileo’s presentation of his newly made 8x telescope to the Doge of Venice amongst many other important officials. He pointed the telescope not at the stars but to the sea, where he showed a ship could be seen through it two hours before being spotted by the naked eye. Thoroughly impressing those present, his salary was doubled and he went on to make telescopes up to about 30x magnification, which he famously used to observe the sky.

[Source] Fresco by Giuseppe Bertini
Further reading: [x]
*Any Italian-speaking followers of mine, feel free to correct this quick internet translation!

Galileo Galilei, with his telescope from here August 21, 1609 widened the horizons of man in the fourth centenary*

This plaque, present on the viewing platform of St Mark’s Campanile, refers to Galileo’s presentation of his newly made 8x telescope to the Doge of Venice amongst many other important officials. He pointed the telescope not at the stars but to the sea, where he showed a ship could be seen through it two hours before being spotted by the naked eye. Thoroughly impressing those present, his salary was doubled and he went on to make telescopes up to about 30x magnification, which he famously used to observe the sky.

[Source] Fresco by Giuseppe Bertini

Further reading: [x]

*Any Italian-speaking followers of mine, feel free to correct this quick internet translation!

— 3 weeks ago with 30 notes
#Guess where I've just been on holiday!  #I like Italy  #Galileo  #Venice  #Italy 

oplik:

Last night’s waxing gibbous. I got a 2x Barlow lens and I took the second picture using it with my 10mm eyepiece! It made looking at the moon so much better but was a lot more difficult to get a picture. The top one is just a 10mm eyepiece without a barlow.

— 3 weeks ago with 37 notes
#very nice!  #Moon 

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Photo sequence of Saturn: 24 February 2009

This Hubble image shows the progression of four of Saturn’s moon as they circle their parent planet. The orange moon in the image is Titan, Saturn’s largest.

Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgment: M. Wong (STScI/UC Berkeley) and C. Go (Philippines)

— 3 weeks ago with 1123 notes
#queue