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Astronomy with a helping of physics and a pinch of the other sciences.


stephenrahn:

This is a three-minute exposure of the Deneb region. Deneb is the bright star near the center. This is also part of the constellation Cygnus the Swan. The annoying streak is a satellite. #astrophotography #astronomy #canon #6D #space #stars #milkyway #science #deneb #cygnus

stephenrahn:

This is a three-minute exposure of the Deneb region. Deneb is the bright star near the center. This is also part of the constellation Cygnus the Swan. The annoying streak is a satellite. #astrophotography #astronomy #canon #6D #space #stars #milkyway #science #deneb #cygnus

— 3 days ago with 51 notes
for-all-mankind:

Ladies and gentlemen, what you see before you is something that I don’t think has ever been done before. This is a gif of Wednesday’s Lunar Eclipse….seen from the orbit of Mercury.In the image, the Moon can be seen slowly disappearing into Earth’s shadow over the course of an hour. The series of 31 images were taken by the narrow-angle camera on the Messenger spacecraft, orbiting high above Mercury. The Earth and Moon were about 66 million miles from the spacecraft at the time of the Eclipse. In the raw image, Earth is about five pixels across, and the Moon is just over one. The luminosity of the Moon was increased by a factor of 25 in order to make it more visible.While we’ve seen a solar eclipse from the Mir space station before, and a solar eclipse from lunar orbit, I believe this is the first time any eclipse has been seen from the perspective of another planetary body. Absolutely stunning. The full article by the Planetary Society is here.

for-all-mankind:

Ladies and gentlemen, what you see before you is something that I don’t think has ever been done before. This is a gif of Wednesday’s Lunar Eclipse….seen from the orbit of Mercury.

In the image, the Moon can be seen slowly disappearing into Earth’s shadow over the course of an hour. The series of 31 images were taken by the narrow-angle camera on the Messenger spacecraft, orbiting high above Mercury. The Earth and Moon were about 66 million miles from the spacecraft at the time of the Eclipse.

In the raw image, Earth is about five pixels across, and the Moon is just over one. The luminosity of the Moon was increased by a factor of 25 in order to make it more visible.

While we’ve seen a solar eclipse from the Mir space station before, and a solar eclipse from lunar orbit, I believe this is the first time any eclipse has been seen from the perspective of another planetary body. 

Absolutely stunning. The full article by the Planetary Society is here.

— 1 week ago with 1646 notes
alanfriedman:

The moon in total eclipse, setting into a rough Lake Erie. It was WINDY!!

alanfriedman:

The moon in total eclipse, setting into a rough Lake Erie. It was WINDY!!

— 1 week ago with 100 notes

capturingthecosmos:

Here’s a collage of what I was up to this morning. Some thick haze and passing cloud cover really ruined these photos but I’m happy to just have been able to see something.

— 1 week ago with 281 notes

thecosmosmadeconscious:

Up from 3-5 am…alone and unreasonably scared of coyotes up on the hill behind our house…I managed to snap some pictures of the total lunar eclipse this morning.

(via starsaremymuse)

— 1 week ago with 246 notes
discoverynews:

Rare ‘Selenelion’ Possible on Wednesday’s Lunar Eclipse
Observers of Wednesday morning’s total lunar eclipse might be able to catch sight of an extremely rare cosmic sight.
On Oct. 8, Interested skywatchers should attempt to see the total eclipse of the moon and the rising sun simultaneously. The little-used name for this effect is called a “selenelion,” a phenomenon that celestial geometry says cannot happen. Learn more

discoverynews:

Rare ‘Selenelion’ Possible on Wednesday’s Lunar Eclipse

Observers of Wednesday morning’s total lunar eclipse might be able to catch sight of an extremely rare cosmic sight.

On Oct. 8, Interested skywatchers should attempt to see the total eclipse of the moon and the rising sun simultaneously. The little-used name for this effect is called a “selenelion,” a phenomenon that celestial geometry says cannot happen. Learn more

— 1 week ago with 1127 notes
#sorry I haven't posted anything about this!  #I won't be able to see it here in the UK so I haven't been paying much attention to it 
christinetheastrophysicist:


The Nobel Prize in Physics 2014 was awarded jointly to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura “for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources”.

Congratulations to the recipients for their hard work in creating a blue LED, a task that had 30 years of challenges behind it.
More information about blue LEDs is available in this release by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. A more technical release is also available. 

christinetheastrophysicist:

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2014 was awarded jointly to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura “for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources”.

Congratulations to the recipients for their hard work in creating a blue LED, a task that had 30 years of challenges behind it.

More information about blue LEDs is available in this release by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. A more technical release is also available. 

— 1 week ago with 92 notes
#science  #Nobel Prize  #Physics 
Anonymous asked: Hi, I've been following you awhile and I love your blog! I like astronomy and just love seeing whats in space and everything about it is just beautiful. I would like to look into buying a telescope (nothing too expensive) any idea where I could look?


Answer:

Thank you! My telescope was bought online, but you can also buy them in certain shops. Different telescopes are better at different things - send me a message off anon and I can try to recommend one based on how you want to use it? :)

— 1 week ago
#Anonymous  #Ask 
Anonymous asked: Hi emma. I love ur blog so much. Im 16 and wanting to be an astronomer. Lets just say i wanna be like u when i grow up


Answer:

Thank you, this means a lot :) <3

— 1 week ago with 6 notes
#Anonymous  #Ask 
Anonymous asked: Does alien really real? Does astronomers also do investigations on aliens omg that would be so cool


Answer:

We have had no evidence of aliens so far. However, there is the possibility that life exists elsewhere in the universe - whether or not we’d be able to find it is another matter. There are quite a few projects looking into it, including the SETI Institute, with SETI standing for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. 

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
#sorry I would go into this more but I'm tired  #university started again last month  #so much physics to do  #Anonymous  #Ask 
stephenrahn:

That’s one pretty Big Dipper. #space #stars #astronomy #astrophotography #canon #6D #universe #science

stephenrahn:

That’s one pretty Big Dipper. #space #stars #astronomy #astrophotography #canon #6D #universe #science

— 2 weeks ago with 56 notes
Anonymous asked: Ok so I really love space and stuff and I'm currently thinking about going for astronomy, but I literally have no idea how it works, where to work and stuff. Do you have to live or move anywhere? Or can you just do it on your backyard? And how do you get paid? So many questions. If you could answer as many as possible I would appreciate it, thanks xD Also I love your blog


Answer:

As far as I know, most paid astronomers are from a physics/ astrophysics background and are employed by universities or other institutions to carry out scientific research. As with any other job, you’d have to live where the work was - be that at a university, or out at an observatory. 

Backyard astronomy is a great hobby to have, and some scientific discoveries have been made by amateur astronomers, but it’s not something you would be paid for. 

— 2 weeks ago with 7 notes
#also thanks!  #ask  #Anonymous 

capturingthecosmos:

Last night I made it out to my dark sky sight at Jenny Jump State Park. I tried my hand at some guiding and got some okay results. I was so eager since its been a while that I could not stay set on one target I jumped around from The Swan Nebula to the Pinwheel Galaxy (pictured) and many more. These are both single exposures and are not a finished product but I couldn’t resist sharing. The conditions were perfect and I saw more sky then I ever have in my life.

Keep looking up.

— 3 weeks ago with 240 notes
#lovely stuff! 
turntiliburn asked: Do you think that there is life on the moon?


Answer:

All the evidence we have so far suggests not. The Moon really isn’t a great place for life as we know it. Firstly, it doesn’t have an atmosphere, so no oxygen, and crucially no protection from harmful solar radiation. There’s no heat regulation, so the surface can go from hundreds of degrees Celsius during the lunar day, to far below freezing at night. There’s also the lack of water. So no, I don’t think there’s life on the Moon. 

— 3 weeks ago with 2 notes
#ask  #stupiddumbstuff  #Moon  #unless we could send some humans back there for a visit!  #that would be great