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Astronomy with a large helping of physics and a pinch of the other sciences.

kodemunkey asked: Hi Emma, What equipment do you use for observing?


Answer:

Hi! My telescope is a Celestron Astromaster 130 EQ (so a 5.1” Newtonian). I have a range of Meade eyepieces that go from 6.4mm to 40mm, a couple of colour filters, a Moon filter, and a 2x Barlow lens. Currently have a Telrad on my ‘scope and a Baader solar filter I can put on the front. Depends on what I’m observing, but everything I’ve mentioned has come in handy at some point!

Most of my photos that I post were taken with my phone through the ‘scope (easier to get in focus than a camera). Having said that, my family has a camera with a pretty good zoom, so sometimes I use that on its own for lunar photos. 

— 20 hours ago with 8 notes
#kodemunkey  #ask  #astronomy 

lifeinretrograde replied to your post: Solar observing today. Barely a sunspo…

Nice! What sun filter did you use? :)

I believe it’s made out of Baader film. Nothing fancy, just something to block most of the light from entering my ‘scope. :)

— 20 hours ago with 3 notes
#lifeinretrograde 

Solar observing today. Barely a sunspot in sight!

(Usual warning about the dangers of observing the Sun: make sure you have the right equipment - in my case a solar filter for the front of my ‘scope - and know how to use it).

— 20 hours ago with 27 notes
#ignore how bad the photo is  #the dark smudge is a sunspot I swear  #astronomy  #astrophotography  #solar astronomy  #solar astrophotography  #Sun  #My Astrophotos  #also yes that is tape on the tripod I have a new leg for it and will get round to fixing it sometime 

s-c-i-guy:

Summer Solstice 2014

Throwback Sunday to when I took this picture of the night sky above the Polebridge Mercantile Summer Solstice Party in Polebridge, Glacier National Park. Luck was on my side when I took the second picture, during the time that the shutter was open the International Space Station’s solar panels hit just the right angle reflecting the sun directly onto my camera’s sensor.  That day was a good day indeed.

(Source: adamhrabovsky)

— 23 hours ago with 123 notes
#queue 
mashable:

45 years ago today, Apollo 11 landed on the first humans on the moon. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface.

mashable:

45 years ago today, Apollo 11 landed on the first humans on the moon. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface.

(Source: vine.co)

— 1 day ago with 1083 notes
sci-universe:

The line above is the spectrum of a star Beta Ursae Minoris “recorded” in 1976. As I mentioned in a recent post, I was working on astronomical photographic plates. There are about 2000 of such plates in the archives of Tartu Observatory’s astrophysics department and they all hold important and unique observing data of various stars. I digitalized a part of the collection and data which also had to be adjusted and organized.The spectrums recorded from the stars’ light show the chemical composition of them. It was discovered in 19th century and it lead to the birth of astrophysics. (You can read all about its history here.) The technique involved a telescope which collected the light from the object of interest (it didn’t have to be a star), spectrograph which broke the light into a spectrum, and a glass plate with specific emulsion.Observatories around the world have similar archives as the spectroscopy  with astronomical photoplates was the best way to research stars at that time. Now most of them are being digitalized to make an available database which could be very useful for historical research.This is what the spectrum plates of our observatory look like:

sci-universe:

The line above is the spectrum of a star Beta Ursae Minoris “recorded” in 1976. As I mentioned in a recent post, I was working on astronomical photographic plates. There are about 2000 of such plates in the archives of Tartu Observatory’s astrophysics department and they all hold important and unique observing data of various stars. I digitalized a part of the collection and data which also had to be adjusted and organized.

The spectrums recorded from the stars’ light show the chemical composition of them. It was discovered in 19th century and it lead to the birth of astrophysics. (You can read all about its history here.) The technique involved a telescope which collected the light from the object of interest (it didn’t have to be a star), spectrograph which broke the light into a spectrum, and a glass plate with specific emulsion.
Observatories around the world have similar archives as the spectroscopy  with astronomical photoplates was the best way to research stars at that time. Now most of them are being digitalized to make an available database which could be very useful for historical research.

This is what the spectrum plates of our observatory look like:

— 1 day ago with 189 notes
#queue 
christinetheastrophysicist:

A few days ago, we found out that comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is a contact binary. Now we have a rotating view of it. This gif uses 36 images each separated by 20 minutes to show a 360° view of the comet. It takes the comet 12.4 hours to complete one rotation.
Read more about the comet on the Rosetta Blog.

christinetheastrophysicist:

A few days ago, we found out that comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is a contact binary. Now we have a rotating view of it. This gif uses 36 images each separated by 20 minutes to show a 360° view of the comet. It takes the comet 12.4 hours to complete one rotation.

Read more about the comet on the Rosetta Blog.

— 4 days ago with 718 notes

theastrokid:

1: M13. The Great globular cluster in Hercules. Around 300,000 stars exist within this cluster.
2: M11. The wild duck cluster. You can see the different variations of stars through their colours.
3: M57. The ring nebula.The planetary nebula seen here is the remenants of a dying Red giant.
4: Saturn.
5: The battered Lunar surface.


The first 3 images of deep sky objects were all 30 seconds exposures through a 10” Newtonian. My polar alignment was way off, hence the trailing.
The last 2 images of Planetary objects were both taken with my ASI120MC at 1 minute recordings.

— 5 days ago with 189 notes
#queue 
BEHOLD my rough draft of science blogs to follow!!

scienceyoucanlove:

Sorry if people are missing or misfiled, it’s 3:33am and I’ve not even had my second medicine yet, I only follow like 2184 blogs and thus is what I remembered from my old list and the 1700 I went through tonight, I will update and add, if needed:

Science blog list (note * = automatic playlist on blog, **= some kind of graphic material consistently displaced, NSFW= Not safe for work and $= highly recommended, if it belongs to another category)

Highly recommended (in no particular order):

a. http://thesciencellama.tumblr.com

b. http://astronomy-to-zoology.tumblr.com

c. http://sciencesoup.tumblr.com

d. http://scinerds.tumblr.com 

e. http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com

f. http://discere-et-docere.tumblr.com/

g. http://thescienceofreality.tumblr.com

h. http://ucsdhealthsciences.tumblr.com

i. http://giraffeinatree.com/

j. http://madasamarinebiologist.com

k. http://ichthyologist.tumblr.com

l. http://rhamphotheca.tumblr.com

m. http://thatscienceguy.tumblr.com/

n. http://agist9.tumblr.com/

o. http://spaceplasma.tumblr.com/

p. http://infinity-imagined.tumblr.com

q. http://scienceing.tumblr.com/

r. http://nuclearvault.tumblr.com/

s. http://s-c-i-guy.tumblr.com/ (gif warning)

t. http://we-are-star-stuff.tumblr.com/

u. http://earthandscience.tumblr.com/

v. http://laboratoryequipment.tumblr.com/

w. http://alxndrasplace.tumblr.com/

x. http://bbsrc.tumblr.com/

y. http://john-white-wildlife.tumblr.com/

Biology:

a. http://biologylair.tumblr.com

b. http://ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology.tumblr.com

c. http://bitesizedbiology.tumblr.com/

d. http://madbiology.tumblr.com/

e. http://caffeinated-biologist.tumblr.com/

Physics:

a. http://fuckyeahfluiddynamics.tumblr.com

b. http://blog.travisleroysouthworth.com/

c. http://physicistsneedlovetoo.tumblr.com/

Engineering:

a. http://engineering.tumblr.com/

b. http://engineeringisawesome.com/

News (not just science):

a. http://discoverynews.tumblr.com

b. http://wired.tumblr.com

c. http://mothernaturenetwork.tumblr.com

d. http://rtamerica.tumblr.com/

e. http://guardian.tumblr.com/

f. http://bpod-mrc.tumblr.com/

g. http://kqedscience.tumblr.com/

Space:

a. http://n-a-s-a.tumblr.com ($)

b. http://astronomicalwonders.tumblr.com/

c. http://distant-traveller.tumblr.com/ ($)

d. http://spaceflightinhistory.tumblr.com/ ($)

e. http://for-all-mankind.tumblr.com/ ($)

f. http://canadian-space-agency.tumblr.com/

g. http://humanoidhistory.tumblr.com/ ($)

h. http://astronomypictureoftheday.tumblr.com/ ($)

I. http://astronemma.tumblr.com/ ($)

m. http://galactic-centre.tumblr.com/

n. http://i-am-a-space-child.tumblr.com/

General science:

a. http://science-and-logic.tumblr.com

b. http://fortysixchromes.tumblr.com

c. http://biomedicalephemera.tumblr.com/

d. http://scienceisbeauty.tumblr.com

e. http://ohscience.tumblr.com

f. http://imperfectly-packed.tumblr.com/

g. http://fuckyeahmedicalstuff.tumblr.com/

h. http://dinolegovich.tumblr.com/

i. http://fuckyeahendocrinology.tumblr.com/

j. http://teded.tumblr.com/ (gif warning)

k. http://mindblowingscience.tumblr.com/

l. http://science-isinteresting.tumblr.com/

m. http://scienceaddict.tumblr.com/

n. http://cosmic-sentience.tumblr.com/

o. http://utcjonesobservatory.tumblr.com/

p. http://jewsee-medicalstudent.tumblr.com/ ($)

q. http://science-in-a-jar.tumblr.com/ ($)

r. http://thenewenlightenmentage.tumblr.com/

s. http://scipak.tumblr.com/

t. http://abcstarstuff.tumblr.com/

u. http://double-bond.tumblr.com/

v. http://brainsx.tumblr.com/

General Science (casual) 

Read More

(via scienceyoucanlove)

— 6 days ago with 1085 notes
#thanks for including me!  #:) 
zerostatereflex:

Jupiter’s Synchrotron Emission 
"Movie made from observations of Jupiter by the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array. Jupiter’s spin axis is offset from its magnetic poles - meaning Jupiter has a "true north" and "magnetic north" like our planet does."

zerostatereflex:

Jupiter’s Synchrotron Emission

"Movie made from observations of Jupiter by the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array. Jupiter’s spin axis is offset from its magnetic poles - meaning Jupiter has a "true north" and "magnetic north" like our planet does."

— 6 days ago with 511 notes
#Jupiter  #queue 

scishow:

Graphene: The Next Big (But Thin) Thing

If you haven’t heard of it before, you have now. And it may prove to be the next big thing in materials science. SciShow explains what it is, why it’s so awesome, and what challenges we face in harnessing its amazing properties.

— 6 days ago with 147 notes
#graphene  #yay Manchester!  #best physics department :)  #(I'm biased) 

spaceplasma:

Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

An artist’s conception of the environment around GRB 020819B based on ALMA observations. The GRB occurred in an arm of a galaxy in the constellation of Pisces (The Fishes). GRBs are huge explosions of a star spouting high-speed jets in a direction toward the observer. In a complete surprise, less gas was observed than expected, and correspondingly much more dust, making some GRBs appear as “dark GRBs”.

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are intense bursts of extremely high energy observed in distant galaxies — the brightest explosive phenomenon in the Universe. Bursts that last more than a couple of seconds are known as long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) and are associated with supernova explosions — powerful detonations at the ends of the lives of massive stars.

In just a matter of seconds, a typical burst releases as much energy as the Sun will in its entire ten-billion-year lifetime. The explosion itself is often followed by a slowly fading emission, known as an afterglow, which is thought to be created by collisions between the ejected material and the surrounding gas. However, some gamma-ray bursts mysteriously seem to have no afterglow — they are referred to as dark bursts. One possible explanation is that clouds of dust absorb the afterglow radiation.

  • More information: here

Credit: Bunyo Hatsukade(NAOJ), ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

— 1 week ago with 1303 notes
#queue 
ageofdestruction:

just a little heartache: Departing the Moon, photographed by Apollo 17, December 1972.
Showing the terminator on the lunar farside. The peaked crater at left is Tsiolkovskiy, again.
No date and time information attached to these images, but presumably just after escape from lunar orbit at midnight on the 16th.
Image credit: NASA/JSC/ASU. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

ageofdestruction:

just a little heartache: Departing the Moon, photographed by Apollo 17, December 1972.

Showing the terminator on the lunar farside. The peaked crater at left is Tsiolkovskiy, again.

No date and time information attached to these images, but presumably just after escape from lunar orbit at midnight on the 16th.

Image credit: NASA/JSC/ASU. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

— 1 week ago with 951 notes